Lifetime Achievement Award

 
Each year, as part of its mission, the DC Jazz Festival (DCJF) honors jazz greats for their lifetime contributions to jazz and humanity

The DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award is bestowed, at a concert during the annual festival, to an individual who serves as a model representative for jazz and has dedicated his/her life to jazz as an art form, an education tool, and a unifying force.

The 2012 DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to two unique jazz legends: brilliant pianist Kenny Barron, and the multi-talented, Ron Carter.

 

 

ROY HAYNES is the pulse of legendary jazz. For over 50 years Roy Haynes has influenced and innovated, shaping some of the greatest recordings in jazz while his joyous drumming with the legends of the genre altered the very fabric and direction of jazz improvisation. Louis Armstrong, Lester Young, Charlie Parker, Thelonius Monk, Sarah Vaughn, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Dizzy Gillespie, Bud Powell, Ella Fitzgerald, Stan Getz, Chick Corea, Pat Metheny. The list goes on and on as does Roy's unflagging energy and marvelous invention.

With his latest group of 20-something cohorts, Roy sends his "Hard Swing" to a timeless place.  Haynes elevates the performances of his FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH BAND matching fire stroke for fire stroke, thrill for thrill, a tremendous give and take between the generations fueled by masterful musicianship and youthful abandon.

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Virtuoso bassist, cellist, composer, educator, and author, Ron Carter’s reputation in the music world is peerless. He performs with stunning virtuosity and impeccable taste as both a leader of his own groups and a supportive collaborator. With more than 2,500 albums to his credit, the two-time Grammy Award-winner has recorded and performed with many of the greatest names in music, including Miles Davis, Stan Getz, Gil Evans, Lena Horne, Aretha Franklin, Sonny Rollins, B.B. King, and Carlos Santana, among countless others. Carter has lectured, conducted, and performed at clinics and masters classes, instructing jazz ensembles and teaching the business of music.

Virtuoso bassist, cellist, composer, educator, and author, Ron Carter’s reputation in the music world is peerless. He performs with stunning virtuosity and impeccable taste as both a leader of his own groups and a supportive collaborator. With more than 2,500 albums to his credit, the two-time Grammy Award-winner has recorded and performed with many of the greatest names in music, including Miles Davis, Stan Getz, Gil Evans, Lena Horne, Aretha Franklin, Sonny Rollins, B.B. King, and Carlos Santana, among countless others. Carter has lectured, conducted, and performed at clinics and masters classes, instructing jazz ensembles and teaching the business of music.

He also authored a series of books, among which are Building Jazz Bass Lines and The Music of Ron Carter; the latter contains 130 of his published and recorded compositions.

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Kenny Barron  2012 DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award winner

Kenny Barron has been lauded as “one of the top jazz pianists in the world” by The Los Angeles Times and “the most lyrical piano player of our time” by Jazz Weekly. His unmatched ability to mesmerize audiences with his elegant playing, sensitive melodies, and infectious rhythms has earned him nine Grammy-Award nominations and countless honors. Barron joined jazz legend Dizzy Gillespie's celebrated quintet in 1962, during which time he developed an acute appreciation for Latin and Caribbean rhythms. In 1974, he recorded the first of more than 40 albums, Sunset To Dawn.

Kenny Barron has been lauded as “one of the top jazz pianists in the world” by The Los Angeles Times and “the most lyrical piano player of our time” by Jazz Weekly. His unmatched ability to mesmerize audiences with his elegant playing, sensitive melodies, and infectious rhythms has earned him nine Grammy-Award nominations and countless honors. Barron joined jazz legend Dizzy Gillespie's celebrated quintet in 1962, during which time he developed an acute appreciation for Latin and Caribbean rhythms. In 1974, he recorded the first of more than 40 albums, Sunset To Dawn. From 1973 to 2000, Barron served as professor of music at Rutgers University, where he mentored many of today's young talents, including David Sánchez, Terence Blanchard, and Regina Bell.

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James Moody  2010 DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award winner

James Moody was an institution in jazz from the late '40s into the 21st century, whether on tenor, flute, occasional alto, or yodeling his way through his "Moody's Mood for Love." After serving in the Air Force (1943-1946), he joined Dizzy Gillespie's bebop orchestra and began a lifelong friendship with the trumpeter. Moody toured Europe with Gillespie and then stayed overseas for several years, working with Miles Davis, Max Roach, and top European players. His 1949 recording of "I'm in the Mood for Love" became a hit in 1952 under the title of "Moody's Mood for Love" with classic vocalese lyrics written by Eddie Jefferson and a best-selling recording by King Pleasure.

James Moody was an institution in jazz from the late '40s into the 21st century, whether on tenor, flute, occasional alto, or yodeling his way through his "Moody's Mood for Love." After serving in the Air Force (1943-1946), he joined Dizzy Gillespie's bebop orchestra and began a lifelong friendship with the trumpeter. Moody toured Europe with Gillespie and then stayed overseas for several years, working with Miles Davis, Max Roach, and top European players. His 1949 recording of "I'm in the Mood for Love" became a hit in 1952 under the title of "Moody's Mood for Love" with classic vocalese lyrics written by Eddie Jefferson and a best-selling recording by King Pleasure. After returning to the U.S., Moody formed a septet that lasted for five years, recorded extensively for Prestige and Argo, took up the flute, and then from 1963-1968, was a member of Dizzy Gillespie's quintet. He worked in Las Vegas show bands during much of the 1970s before returning to jazz, playing occasionally with Gillespie, mostly working as a leader and recording with Lionel Hampton's Golden Men of Jazz. Moody, who alternated between tenor (which he preferred) and alto throughout his career, had an original sound on both horns. He was also one of the best flutists in jazz. Moody recorded as a leader for numerous labels, including Blue Note, Xanadu, Vogue, Prestige, EmArcy, Mercury, Argo, DJM, Milestone, Perception, MPS, Muse, Vanguard, and Novus. He died on December 9, 2010 in San Diego, CA. He was 85 years old.

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Ellis Marsalis  2009 DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award winner

Ellis Marsalis is regarded by many as the premier modern jazz pianist in New Orleans.  Born on November 14, 1934, his formal music studies began at age eleven at the Xavier University junior school of music. After high school, Marsalis enrolled in Dillard University (New Orleans, LA) as a clarinet major. He graduated in 1955 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Education. Marsalis spent the next year working as an assistant manager in his fathers motel business.

Ellis Marsalis is regarded by many as the premier modern jazz pianist in New Orleans.  Born on November 14, 1934, his formal music studies began at age eleven at the Xavier University junior school of music. After high school, Marsalis enrolled in Dillard University (New Orleans, LA) as a clarinet major. He graduated in 1955 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Education. Marsalis spent the next year working as an assistant manager in his fathers motel business.

The following year, Marsalis joined the U.S. Marine Corps. While stationed in southern California he honed his pianist skills as a member of the Corps Four, a Marines jazz quartet that performed on television ("Dress Blues," named for the formal Marine Corps uniform and broadcast on CBS) and radio shows (“Leatherneck Songbook”).  Both shows were used to boost recruiting efforts. After completing his Marine Corps duty, Marsalis returned to New Orleans and married Dolores Ferdinand, a New Orleanian, who bore him six sons; Branford, Wynton, Ellis III, Delfeayo, Mboya and Jason.

In 1964 Marsalis, his wife Dolores and, at the time, four sons, moved to the small rural town of Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, where he spent two years as a school band and choral director at Carver high school.  Returning to New Orleans in 1966, he began freelancing on the local music scene.  Between 1966 and 1974 Marsalis would perform at the Playboy Club (New Orleans), Al Hirt nightclub, Lu and Charlie’s nightclub, Storyville nightclub Crazy Shirley’s as well as again enter the teaching profession, in 1967, as an adjunct professor of African American Music at Xavier University (New Orleans, LA).

As the family continued to grow, Marsalis continued his educational pursuits, attending Loyola University’s (New Orleans, LA) Masters Degree program in the early summer session of 1974. He would also successfully interview for a teaching position at a new Magnet high school for the arts, the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA), and be hired as an instructor for the Fall semester (1974). Marsalis would spend the next twelve years at NOCCA as an instrumental music teacher with a Jazz studies emphasis.

In 1986, Marsalis accepted a teaching position out of state.  He became a Commonwealth Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University (Richmond, Virginia), serving as coordinator of Jazz Studies two of his three years there.  In 1989, he returned to New Orleans to become the first occupant and Director of the Coca Cola endowed Chair of Jazz Studies at the University of New Orleans.  During his tenure at UNO he helped fellow colleague Charles Blancq develop a campus performance center called the Sand Bar.  Marsalis would also develop a Jazz Orchestra, which he took, on the eve of his retirement, on a tour of Brazil.  On August 10, 2001, Marsalis officially retired from the University of New Orleans after twelve years of dedicated service.  His retirement was celebrated by a very rare performance of Branford, Wynton, Delfeayo and Jason Marsalis at the UNO arena.

Marsalis is the recipient of Honorary Doctorate degrees from his alma mater Dillard University, New Orleans, LA (1989); Ball State University, Muncie, IN (1997); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (2010); Tulane University, New Orleans, LA; and The Juilliard School, New York, NY.  In 2011, Marsalis and his family were awarded the highest honor in Jazz, NEA Jazz Masters, the first group award ever distributed by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Marsalis continues to be active as a performing pianist leading, and occasionally touring, his own quartet. He has several recordings on the CBS-SONY label and currently releases recordings on his own recording label, ELM RECORDS, developed with his wife Dolores and son Jason.

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George Wein  2008 DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award winner

George Wein is indisputably the “godfather” of the jazz festival movement and is best known as the impresario who has promoted jazz festivals, musicians and their music worldwide for over sixty years. Born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1925, Wein was a jazz pianist in his youth and led a small group while studying at Boston University. In 1950, he opened a jazz club called Storyville and established a record label by the same name. In 1954, Louis and Elaine Lorillard engaged Wein to organize a jazz festival; the subsequent festival was the first outdoor jazz festival in the United States – the famed Newport Jazz Festival.

George Wein is indisputably the “godfather” of the jazz festival movement and is best known as the impresario who has promoted jazz festivals, musicians and their music worldwide for over sixty years. Born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1925, Wein was a jazz pianist in his youth and led a small group while studying at Boston University. In 1950, he opened a jazz club called Storyville and established a record label by the same name. In 1954, Louis and Elaine Lorillard engaged Wein to organize a jazz festival; the subsequent festival was the first outdoor jazz festival in the United States – the famed Newport Jazz Festival. Wein went on to start festivals in other cities including the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival and the Playboy Jazz Festival in Los Angeles. In the 1960s, he set up Festival Productions, a company dedicated to promoting large and small-scale jazz events. .

Wein has received a wide array of honors for his untiring dedication including the Studio Museum of Harlem, Patron of the Arts Award and the AARP Impact Award. He was also decorated with France’s Légion d’honneur, appointed Commandeur de L’Ordre des Arts et Lettres by the French government and honored by past U.S. presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton. Born in 1918 in Vicksburg , Mississippi , Hank Jones grew up in Pontiac , Michigan. Although his father thought playing Jazz at the time was 'evil', Hank start playing in local bands in Michigan , Ohio and Buffalo before moving to New York City in 1943. His first job was with Hot Lips Page at the Onyx Club on 52nd Street where in 1945 he joined Billy Eckstine's big band. The following year he joined Colman Hawkins and from 1947 to 1951 he toured the world with the Jazz at the Philharmonic (JATP) accompanying Ella Fitzgerald. In 1952 he joined Artie Shaw and then worked with Johnny Hodges followed by Tyree Glenn. In 1956 he joined Benny Goodman and joined the CBS studios as staff pianist in 1959, a position which would last for seventeen years.

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Buck Hill, is a Washington icon, who has been sharing his uncommon talent and musical abilities with jazz fans for over forty years. Born in 1927, Hill started playing the saxophone at 13 years old and performed while supporting his family by working at the post office earning him the nickname the “Wailing Mailman.” Hill has recorded, appeared and toured with Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Kenny Barron and Shirley Horn. In 1957, he recorded his fi rst tracks with renowned guitarist Charlie Byrd and later appeared on numerous recordings with Shirley Horn. He is a renowned and honored saxophonist, respected by critics, fellow musicians, and fans alike.

Buck Hill, is a Washington icon, who has been sharing his uncommon talent and musical abilities with jazz fans for over forty years. Born in 1927, Hill started playing the saxophone at 13 years old and performed while supporting his family by working at the post office earning him the nickname the “Wailing Mailman.” Hill has recorded, appeared and toured with Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Kenny Barron and Shirley Horn. In 1957, he recorded his fi rst tracks with renowned guitarist Charlie Byrd and later appeared on numerous recordings with Shirley Horn. He is a renowned and honored saxophonist, respected by critics, fellow musicians, and fans alike.

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Hank Jones, 2007 DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award winner

The eldest surviving member of a prolific Jazz musician family, which included the late drummer Elvin Jones and trumpeter/composer Thad Jones, Hank Jones continues the legacy by recording and playing at concerts and festivals around the world. As one of the few surviving Jazz greats photographed in 'A Great Day in Harlem ', he has also participated in other historical events such as accompanying Marilyn Monroe when she sang 'Happy Birthday Mr. President' to the late President John F. Kennedy.

The eldest surviving member of a prolific Jazz musician family, which included the late drummer Elvin Jones and trumpeter/composer Thad Jones, Hank Jones continues the legacy by recording and playing at concerts and festivals around the world. As one of the few surviving Jazz greats photographed in 'A Great Day in Harlem ', he has also participated in other historical events such as accompanying Marilyn Monroe when she sang 'Happy Birthday Mr. President' to the late President John F. Kennedy.

Hank Jones has been recognized by many organizations throughout his career for the many significant contributions to Jazz. Here are just a few of the notable awards and titles conferred upon him:

  • National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master
  • The International Jazz Hall of Fame
  • JazzFest 2002 Jazz Master
  • Congressional Achievement Award
  • Living Legend Jazz Hall of Fame: ASCAP
  • Grammy Nominations for: 'Bop Redux', 'Love for sale' & 'I Remember You'
  • Jazz Journalist Award
  • Highlights in Jazz Award

Born in 1918 in Vicksburg , Mississippi , Hank Jones grew up in Pontiac , Michigan. Although his father thought playing Jazz at the time was 'evil', Hank start playing in local bands in Michigan , Ohio and Buffalo before moving to New York City in 1943. His first job was with Hot Lips Page at the Onyx Club on 52nd Street where in 1945 he joined Billy Eckstine's big band. The following year he joined Colman Hawkins and from 1947 to 1951 he toured the world with the Jazz at the Philharmonic (JATP) accompanying Ella Fitzgerald. In 1952 he joined Artie Shaw and then worked with Johnny Hodges followed by Tyree Glenn. In 1956 he joined Benny Goodman and joined the CBS studios as staff pianist in 1959, a position which would last for seventeen years.

Throughout his career, Hank has played and recorded with the virtual who's who of Jazz history. With over five hundred albums and CDs recorded and countless concerts, there aren't too many significant names in Jazz that Hank has not played or recorded with. Most recently, he has been involved in recordings and performances with the contemporaries such as Joe Lovano. As Hank reflects on his past, one regret is that he did not record more with his late brothers Thad and Elvin. However, he was able to make his last recording 'The Great Trio Collaboration' on Village Records with Elvin last year before he passed away.

Although the thought of retirement had crossed his mind, at 89, Hank Jones stays busy playing concerts worldwide, recording and performing at Jazz Master classes in Universities such as Harvard and NYU. Recently featured on the cover of the June 2005 issue of Downbeat magazine, the world is recognizing that Hank Jones is one of the last surviving Jazz greats that helped to forge this great musical genre called Jazz. Always the consummate professional, Hank Jones has lived his life and career honoring the musical genre of Jazz and he is now recognized around the world as one of the true great Jazz Masters.

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Clark Terry  2007 DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award winner

Clark Terry's career in jazz spans more than sixty years. He is a world-class trumpeter, flugelhornist, educator, and NEA Jazz Master. He has performed for seven U.S. Presidents, and was a Jazz Ambassador for State Department tours in the Middle East and Africa. More than fifty jazz festivals in all seven continents still feature him. He received a Grammy Award, two Grammy certificates, three Grammy nominations, thirteen honorary doctorates, keys to cities, lifetime achievements and halls of fame awards. He was knighted in Germany and is the recipient of the French Order of Arts and Letters.

Clark Terry's career in jazz spans more than sixty years. He is a world-class trumpeter, flugelhornist, educator, and NEA Jazz Master. He has performed for seven U.S. Presidents, and was a Jazz Ambassador for State Department tours in the Middle East and Africa. More than fifty jazz festivals in all seven continents still feature him. He received a Grammy Award, two Grammy certificates, three Grammy nominations, thirteen honorary doctorates, keys to cities, lifetime achievements and halls of fame awards. He was knighted in Germany and is the recipient of the French Order of Arts and Letters. Clark's star on the Walk of Fame, and his Black World History Museum's life-sized wax figure can both be visited in his hometown, St. Louis, Missouri.

Clark composed more than two hundred jazz songs, and his books include "Let's Talk Trumpet: From Legit to Jazz", "Interpretation of the Jazz Language" and "Clark Terry's System of Circular Breathing for Woodwind and Brass Instruments".

He recorded with The London Symphony Orchestra, The Dutch Metropole Orchestra, The Duke Ellington Orchestra and The Chicago Jazz Orchestra, at least thirty high school and college ensembles, his own duos, trios, quartets, quintets, sextets, octets, and two big bands -- Clark Terry's Big Bad Band and Clark Terry's Young Titans of Jazz. His career as both leader and sideman with more than three hundred recordings demonstrates that he is one of the luminaries in jazz.

Clark's discography reads like a "Who's Who In Jazz," with personnel that includes great jazz artists such as Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Quincy Jones, Ella Fitzgerald, Oscar Peterson, Dizzy Gillespie, Dinah Washington, Ben Webster, Charlie Barnet, Doc Severinsen, Ray Charles, Billy Strayhorn, Dexter Gordon, Thelonious Monk, Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughn, Coleman Hawkins, Zoot Sims, Milt Jackson, Bob Brookmeyer, Jon Faddis, and Dianne Reeves.

"Clark Terry," writes Chuck Berg, "is one of contemporary music's great innovators, and justly celebrated for his great technical virtuosity, swinging lyricism, and impeccable good taste. Combining these with the gifts of a great dramatist, Clark is a master storyteller whose spellbinding musical 'tales' leave audiences thrilled and always awaiting more."

In the 1940s, after serving in the Navy, Clark's musical star rose rapidly with successful stints in the bands of George Hudson, Charlie Barnet, Charlie Ventura, Eddie Vinson, and then in 1948 -- the great Count Basie. In addition to his outstanding musical contribution to these bands, Mr. Terry exerted a positive influence on musicians such as Miles Davis and Quincy Jones, both of whom credit Clark as a formidable influence during the early stages of their careers. In 1951 Clark was asked to join Maestro Duke Ellington's renowned orchestra where he stayed for eight years as a featured soloist.

Following a tour with Harold Arlen's "Free and Easy" show directed by Quincy Jones in 1960, Clark's international recognition soared when he accepted an offer from the National Broadcasting Company to become its first African American staff musician. Soon after, Clark became a ten year television star as one of the spotlighted players in the Tonight Show band where he scored a smash hit as a singer with his irrepressible "Mumbles." From the 70's through the 90's, Clark performed at Carnegie Hall, Town Hall, and Lincoln Center, toured with the Newport Jazz All Stars and Jazz at the Philharmonic, and he was featured with Skitch Henderson's New York Pops Orchestra. Since 2000, he hosts Clark Terry Jazz Festivals on land and sea, and his own jazz camps.

Prompted early in his career by Dr. Billy Taylor, Clark and Milt Hinton bought instruments for and gave instruction to young hopefuls which planted the seed that became Jazz Mobile in Harlem. This venture tugged at Clark's greatest love - involving youth in the perpetuation of Jazz. Between global performances, Clark continues to share wholeheartedly his jazz expertise and encourage students.

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Billy Taylor  2006 DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award winner

Dr. Billy Taylor, distinguished ambassador from the world of jazz to the world at large, has served as the Kennedy Center's Artistic Advisor for Jazz since 1994 and has developed numerous ongoing concert series and the KC Jazz Club. His live show, Billy Taylor's Jazz at the Kennedy Center, was produced by NPR for an eight-year series of radio programs broadcast throughout the United States. In 2001, Dr. Taylor presented his jazz collection and memorabilia assembled over more than 65 years, to the Library of Congress - the largest and most inclusive jazz archive ever acquired by the Library.

Dr. Billy Taylor, distinguished ambassador from the world of jazz to the world at large, has served as the Kennedy Center's Artistic Advisor for Jazz since 1994 and has developed numerous ongoing concert series and the KC Jazz Club. His live show, Billy Taylor's Jazz at the Kennedy Center, was produced by NPR for an eight-year series of radio programs broadcast throughout the United States. In 2001, Dr. Taylor presented his jazz collection and memorabilia assembled over more than 65 years, to the Library of Congress - the largest and most inclusive jazz archive ever acquired by the Library.

Billy Taylor was born in Greenville, North Carolina, in 1921 and grew up in Washington, DC. Throughout the 1940s Billy Taylor played with Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Machito, Coleman Hawkins, Eddie South, Stuff Smith, and Slam Stewart. As the house pianist at Birdland, he supported many of that eras jazz standouts, including Dizzy Gillespie. He then went on to perform predominantly as the leader of his own trios.

Dr. Taylor has written many works on various jazz-related subjects including the first book ever written about bebop piano. He has some 300 compositions to his credit, including - I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free, featured as the theme for the film, Ghosts of Mississippi. He has been commissioned by numerous artistic organizations to create works combining jazz and orchestral music, music for dance, and civic occasions. Dr. Taylor is also considered to be the foremost jazz educator of our time, from co-founding community grass roots efforts, such as Jazzmobile, and programs focusing on young people and adults, to master classes and seminars for professionals.

The Center for Research in Black Culture designated Dr. Taylor as one of the top 100 Black New Yorkers of the 20th Century. He was named an NEA Jazz Master in 1988 and received the Grammy Trustees Award in 2005. In 2007, Dr. Taylor was one of the jazz luminaries honored with the Living Jazz Legend Award

Dr. Taylor has dedicated the remainder of his career to advocacy for the music that he loves by imparting his vast knowledge and wisdom to the thousands of young musicians who follow in his footsteps.

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Dave Brubeck 2005 DCJF Lifetime Achievement Award winner

Regarded as one of the most accomplished pianists of all time, Dave Brubeck was presented with the inaugural Duke Ellington Jazz Festival Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005. An early experimenter in combining jazz with symphony orchestras, Brubeck continues to appear as composer-performer in concerts of his choral and symphonic orchestral compositions. Over his long career, Dave Brubeck recorded with such legendary figures as Louis Armstrong, Jimmy Rushing, Gerry Mulligan and Carmen McRae, as well as current "Young Lions" Roy Hargrove, Joshua Redman and Christian McBride.

Regarded as one of the most accomplished pianists of all time, Dave Brubeck was presented with the inaugural Duke Ellington Jazz Festival Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005. An early experimenter in combining jazz with symphony orchestras, Brubeck continues to appear as composer-performer in concerts of his choral and symphonic orchestral compositions. Over his long career, Dave Brubeck recorded with such legendary figures as Louis Armstrong, Jimmy Rushing, Gerry Mulligan and Carmen McRae, as well as current "Young Lions" Roy Hargrove, Joshua Redman and Christian McBride.

By 1954 Brubeck's popularity was such that his picture appeared on the cover of Time Magazine and his recordings were being played throughout the world. His album "Time Out" and the hits "Take Five" and "Blue Rondo a la Turk" went "gold," a rare feat for an instrumental jazz recording. Always expanding jazz horizons, the Dave Brubeck Quartet performed, and in 1959 recorded, with Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra. Subsequent world tours by the Quartet, including several for the U.S. State Department, made Brubeck one of America's foremost goodwill ambassadors. He entertained world leaders at the Reagan-Gorbachev Summit in Moscow in 1988; he has performed before eight U.S. Presidents, princes, kings, heads of state, and Pope John Paul ll.

In recognition of his ongoing contribution to jazz, he also received the prestigious NEA Jazz Master's Award in 1999 and the National Medal of the Arts from President Clinton. His musical contributions as both pianist and composer have also been recognized with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. The International Association of Jazz Educators inducted him into the Jazz Hall of Fame at their annual conference earlier this year. These are but a few of the honors bestowed upon this elder statesman of jazz, whose career spans six decades.

Adding to his long list of honors and awards, The University of the Pacific established the The Brubeck Institute in 1999. The Institute is dedicated to the promulgation of contemporary music of all styles, with an emphasis on jazz and improvisation.

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